Sin + Illy Still Alive

Friday 14 July | 3.15 pm | CCA: Centre For Contemporary Arts 

Directed by: Maria Hengge 

70′ | 2014 | Germany



 

Sin and Illy have a plan: on a Greek island they want to get ‘clean’ on their own. But the intention of the two girls fails already on the way to the airport. Finally Sin realises she has to go the way out of heroin addiction all alone.

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Four Passports

Friday July 14 | 1.15 pm | CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts 

Written & Directed by Mihajlo Jevtic

83′ | 2016 | Serbia 



 

Four Passports is a partly animated first-person documentary about emigration and identity in the aftermath of former Yugoslavia’s dissolution told from the perspective of filmmaker Mihajlo Jevtic. From the SFRY to today’s Serbia, from Mihajlo’s childhood into his adulthood: This is a film made by a guy about to leave his country, his emigrant’s suitcase. The story of four passports and one country – a farewell 25 years in the making. 

Short Films: Antiphysis

Thursday 13 July | 2 pm | CCA: Centre For Contemporary Arts


 

Now Appearing in Bucharest by Ro Lawrence 

US / Romania | 4’ | 2015 

Bucharest may or may not be the Paris of the East, but it certainly is a daily dance between history and the present. In this short experimental film a montage of concert posters announcing upcoming performances dance their inevitable passage into the past… a meditation on the precarity of the popular… loose change from a libidinal economy. 


Blaha Luisa Ter by Antonin Blanc

Hungary | 27’ | 2016 

The National Theatre of Hungary no longer stands at the heart of Blaha Lujza square, yet the play continues… There is an invisible barrier that separates the stone faces of the passers by, the whispers of those who wait, and the music from the deep end of the square. At the crossroads of a heavy past and a bitter present, the daily grind and routine of the theatre continues to unfold. Will the masks ever fall and allow us to meet on the street? 


And around… and around… and around… (Processes of territorialisation, de-territorialisation, re-territorialisation) by Carlos Coelho Costa

 Portugal | 4’ | 2016 

Passing, whether physically or virtually, through space, is a process of the construction of knowledge, whose movements can be recognised as a practice of intertwining – performative movements that foster, in a certain space-time, the becoming of new orders; movements that are perceived as forms of territorialisation, de-territorialisation, re-territorialisation. Through the movement of territorialisation, a reordering of relationships with space is perceived, in the sense of an appropriation of the territory, whilst de-territorialisation is defined as a loss of relationships or of the signs of its appropriation. The movement of re-territorialisation presupposes the revisiting, or re-appropriation of the territory, giving back or attributing new meanings to it. “And around… and around…and around…” constitutes a body of experienced possibilities and in the meantime the possibility of new constructions. 


Antiphysis by Steve Vasiliou

 Greece | 18′ | 2016 

I asked ten-year-old students if there would be Elephants on 

Earth in one hundred years. Every single answer was “no”. 

The pictorial and musical journey of “Antiphysis” contrasts chaos 

with calm. This film invites viewers not only to watch and listen to 

music, but to feel, react, and think deeply about our very existence. 

What are we doing and why? 

Nature today is considered by many as an enemy to be ravaged. “Antiphysis” exposes this destruction by revealing greedy actions that endanger the future of all living things. As this film shows, for now our tiny Earth is the only home we have. 

The islands and the whales

Thursday July 13 | 3.30 pm | CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts 

Directed by: Mike Day 

Documentary | 81’ | 2016 | United Kingdom 


In their remote home in the North Atlantic the Faroe Islanders have always eaten what nature could provide, proud to put local food on the table. The land yields little, so they have always relied on harvesting their seas. 



Hunting whales and seabirds kept them alive for generations, and gave them the way of life they love; a life they would pass on to their children. But today they face a grave threat to this tradition. 

It is not the controversy surrounding whaling that threatens the Faroese way of life; the danger is coming from the whales themselves. 

The Faroese are among the first to feel the affects of our ever more polluted oceans. They have discovered that their beloved whales are toxic, contaminated by the outside world. What once secured their survival now endangers their children and the Faroe Islanders must make a choice between health and tradition. 

About the filmmaker: Mike is a director, cinematographer, and producer from Scotland. Originally trained as a lawyer, Mike made the transition into film in 2009 when he headed off into the Scottish Outer Hebrides on a boat with a camera and met the Guga Hunters of Ness. The resulting documentary was commissioned by the BBC and screened internationally. Mike then went on to be one of EDN’s 12 for the Future, and one of 10 to watch in The Filmmaker Magazine. Supported by Sundance Institute, San Francisco Film Society, Creative Europe, Creative Scotland, Wellcome Trust, and the Danish Film Institute Mike then made the feature documentary, The Islands and the Whales in the Faroe Islands, released in 2016 the film has gone on to win multiple awards including Hotdocs Best Emerging International Filmmaker Award and a BAFTA Scotland nomination.

Mike was listed as one the ’10 Filmmakers to Watch in 2012’ by Filmmaker Magazine, he was one of EDN’s 12 for the Future 2012, the first Scot on the Nordic programme, he is a Sundance Documentary Film Program Fellow, has pitched at Good Pitch 2015 and EIFF 2011, was on the EIFF 2012 Talent Lab, and is supported by the Scottish Documentary Institute’s Docscene programme.

Brexitannia

Wednesday July 12 | 8.30 pm | CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts 

Directed by: Timothy George Kelly 

Documentary | 80’ | 2017 | Russia / UK 


The first documentary on Brexit. Featuring Noam Chomsky, Saskia Sassen, Guy Standing, Nick Srnicek, Heidi Mirza & Federico Campagna. 

 


 

On/off. Yes/no. Leave or Remain? While referenda always divide people, Brexit did so in a manner unprecedented in modern British history: old pitted against young, nationalists against migrants, the countryside against the city, and “the people” against “the elite”. But underneath these binaries we find human beings whose individual stories influenced the outcome of this historic and perplexing vote. In the referendum the UK was torn apart by debates over the great themes of our age: migration, waning empires, work and its decreasing relevance in an outsourced world that is becoming ever more automated. 

BREXITANNIA is a portrait of a democracy in all its impossible and ugly glory. With subtle force, yet without judgement, it presents the people of a once powerful empire as they negotiate their identities in a world that is changing faster than ever and in which power appears to lie further and further from people’s own hands. 

About the filmmaker: Timothy George Kelly is an Australian filmmaker whose work often intersects between art, music and politics. His music films have featured artists including Grimes, Mac DeMarco, Tim Hecker and Moscow collective Johns’ Kingdom. Brexitannia is his second feature length documentary. He lives in London.

Brexitannia to open EuropeNow Fest


Europe Now Festival, cutting the ribbon of its inaugural edition on July 12, will open with a screening of the documentary film Brexitannia by Timothy George Kelly, a coproduction between Russia and the United Kingdom.

The film is the very first cinema statement on Brexit, featuring great names from the academic world including Noam Chomsky, Saskia Sassen, Guy Standing, Nick Srnicek, Heidi Mirza and Federico Campagna.

The film will screening on July 12 at the CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts at 8.30 pm.

Brexitannia: On/off. Yes/no. Leave or Remain? While referenda always divide people, Brexit did so in a manner unprecedented in modern British history: old pitted against young, nationalists against migrants, the countryside against the city, and “the people” against “the elite”. But underneath these binaries we find human beings whose individual stories influenced the outcome of this historic and perplexing vote. In the referendum the UK was torn apart by debates over the great themes of our age: migration, waning empires, work and its decreasing relevance in an outsourced world that is becoming ever more automated. 

BREXITANNIA is a portrait of a democracy in all its impossible and ugly glory. With subtle force, yet without judgement, it presents the people of a once powerful empire as they negotiate their identities in a world that is changing faster than ever and in which power appears to lie further and further from people’s own hands. 

About Timothy George Kelly: Timothy George Kelly is a filmmaker and visual artist who has shown work across Europe, Asia and the North America. In 2008 he moved to Montreal where he completed a seven-part short documentary series BIG SMALL and several music videos for artistS such as Grimes and Miracle Fortress. In 2014 he completed his first feature-length documentary A CITY IS AN ISLAND, an exploration of the people and effects of a predominantly anglophone music scene in a francophone Montreal, which premiered at CPH:DOX and RIDM. His film BREXITANNIA also premiered at CPH:DOX.

EuropeNow Festival is a collaboration between WoFF, CES: Council for European Studies – Columbia University in the city of New York and the University of Glasgow with the support of Glasgow City Council.

WoFF 2015 Student Competition: Focus on UK & India

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WoFF: World of Film International Festival Glasgow is setting the scope of its first Commonwealth Student Competition on the UK and India.

The Festival’s spirit to promote independent filmmaking and emerging cinemas from around the world, in conjunction with the Student Competition’s focus on the Commonwealth countries, puts both UK and Indian cinema in the spotlight for the 2015 edition of the festival.

“There is a wind of change in both Indian and British filmmaking and WoFF is happy to be part of it, promoting young cinema in its newest form through our Commonwealth Student Film Contest.” – Martin I. Petrov, Festival Director

An open call to all UK & Indian film schools, the festival will showcase the work of current film students and recent graduates and the student contest jury will award the best film at our closing ceremony on October 4 2015.

Guidelines

The films can be submitted on FilmFreeway through our official submissions page: https://filmfreeway.com/festival/WorldofFilmFestivalGlasgow

All films must be between 1 and 25 mins in length and can be fiction, documentary and animation.

There is no limit on submission for each film school, but only three (3) films per school will be selected to screen in official competition.

WoFF: World of Film International Festival Glasgow is in its second edition and is set for 1 – 4 October 2015 at Glasgow’s CCA: Centre for Contemporary Arts. 

Festival Newsletter: Week 2

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Glasgow, 29 July 2014

The Commonwealth Film & Theatre Festival successfully completed its screening and theatre programme on Sunday July 27th.

With the start of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow last Wednesday, the Festival contributed with its selection of films and theatre performances to the galore of cultural events running currently in the city and around Scotland.

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Panel Discussion on Housing in Glasgow, Wine Reception, Thursday 24 July 2014

With original theatre performances and workshops, films from around the Commonwealth and a free film and theatre journalism workshop in collaboration with NISI MASA, the Festival engaged local communities, artists, writers, film lovers and students and shared the enthusiasm about its multi-stranded programme and the diversity of in and outdoor events and activities.

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NISI MASA Workshop – Final Editorial Meeting, Saturday 26 July 2014

On behalf of the festival organisers Kathi Kamleitner and Martin I. Petrov, we would like to thank all our partners, contributors and supporters who made the CFTF possible. Our warmest thank you belongs to the audience for their attendance and the contribution towards the festival’s success.

We wish everyone amazing cinematic and theatre journey and hope to see you again soon.

Till then, enjoy our five newsletters full of reviews, articles and interviews, all created by our four talented participants in the CFTF NISI MASA workshop.

Newsletter #1

Newsletter #2

Newsletter #3

Newsletter #4

Newsletter #5